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6th January – Prelims Booster

NHRC tells Rajasthan to explain Kota deaths

The National Human Rights Commission (NHRC) issued a notice to the Rajasthan government in connection with the deaths of over 100 children at the government run JK Lon Hospital in December.

About NHRC –

  • India enacted the Protection of Human Rights Act, 1993, with a view to bring about greater accountability and strengthen the dominion of human rights in the country. The National Human Rights Commission (NHRC) was established on October 12, 1993.
  • NHRC was constituted under Section 3 of the 1993 Act for better protection of human rights. The term ‘human rights’ is defined in Section 2(d) of the 1993 Act, which reads as follows: “ “Human rights” means the rights relating to life, liberty, equality and dignity of the individual guaranteed by the Constitution or embodied in the International Covenants and enforceable by courts in India.”

Powers and functions –

  • It is autonomous i.e. it has been created by an Act of Parliament.
  • NHRC is committed to provide independent views on issues within the parlance of the Constitution or in law for the time being enforced for the protection of human rights. The Commission takes an  independent stand.
  • NHRC has the powers of a civil court.
  • Authority to grant interim relief
  • Authority to recommend payment of compensation or damages
  • Over seventy thousand complaints received every year reflects the credibility of the Commission and the trust reposed in it by the citizens.
  • NHRC has a very wide mandate
  • NHRC has unique mechanism with which it also monitors implementation of its various recommendations.

Composition –

The act lays down the qualifications that the members are required to have, to be eligible to be appointed to the Commission. Section 3 of the Act lays down that the Commission shall consist of (after 2019 amendment act) –

  • A Chairperson
  • One Member who is, or has been, a Judge of the Supreme Court of India
  • One Member who is, or has been, the Chief Justice of a High Court
  • Three Members to be appointed from among persons having knowledge of, or practical experience in, matters relating to human rights (one should be a woman)
  • In addition, the Chairperson of the National Commission for Backward Classes, Chairperson of the National Commission for Protection of Child Rights and the Chief Commissioner for Persons with Disabilities as deemed Members of the Commission;

Amendment in 2019 –

The Protection of Human Rights (Amendment) Bill, 2019, inter alia, provides –

  • that a person who has been a Judge of the Supreme Court is also made eligible to be appointed as Chairperson of the Commission in addition to the person who has been the Chief Justice of India;
  • to increase the Members of the Commission from two to three of which, one shall be a woman;
  • to include Chairperson of the National Commission for Backward Classes, Chairperson of the National Commission for Protection of Child Rights and the Chief Commissioner for Persons with Disabilities as deemed Members of the Commission;
  • to reduce the term of the Chairperson and Members of the Commission and the State Commissions from five to three years and shall be eligible for re-appointment;
  • to provide that a person who has been a Judge of a High Court is also made eligible to be appointed as Chairperson of the State Commission in addition to the person who has been the Chief Justice of the High Court; and,
  • to confer upon State Commissions, the functions relating to human rights being discharged by the Union territories, other than the Union territory of Delhi, which will be dealt with by the Commission.

Tatas move to SC against NCLAT order

Chairman emeritus of Tata Sons Private Limited, Ratan N Tata, moved the Supreme Court against the National Company Law Appellate Tribunal’s judgement restoring Cyrus Mistry as its Chairman.

About NCLAT –

  • It was constituted under Section 410 of the Companies Act, 2013 for hearing appeals against the orders of National Company Law Tribunal.
  • NCLAT is also the Appellate Tribunal for hearing appeals against the orders passed by NCLT(s) under Section 61 of the Insolvency and Bankruptcy Code, 2016 (IBC).
  • NCLAT is also the Appellate Tribunal for hearing appeals against the orders passed by Insolvency and Bankruptcy Board of India under Section 202 and Section 211 of IBC.
  • NCLAT is also the Appellate Tribunal to hear and dispose of appeals against any direction issued or decision made or order passed by the Competition Commission of India (CCI).

PM Modi pays tribute to Savitribai Phule

Prime Minister has paid tributes to Savitribai Phule on her Jayanti.

About Savitribai Phule –

  • Savitribai Phule was born in Naigaon, Maharashtra in 1831 and married activist and social-reformer Jyotirao Phule when she was nine years old.
  • Both Jyotirao and Savitribao Phule went on to found India’s first school for girls called Bhide Wada in Pune in 1848.
  • Before this, she started a school with Jyotirao’s cousin Saganbai in Maharwada in 1847.
  • Her books of poems “Kavya Phule” and “Bavan Kashi Subodh Ratnakar” were published in 1934 and 1982.

Fame India-II Scheme

To give a further push to clean mobility in Road Transport Sector, the Department of Heavy Industries has sanctioned 2636 charging stations in 62 cities across 24 States/UTs under FAME India (Faster Adoption and Manufacturing of Electric Vehicles in India) scheme phase II.

About Fame India Scheme –

  • The National Electric Mobility Mission Plan (NEMMP) 2020 is a National Mission document providing the vision and the roadmap for the faster adoption of electric vehicles and their manufacturing in the country.
  • As part of the NEMMP 2020, Department of Heavy Industry formulated a Scheme viz. Faster Adoption and Manufacturing of (Hybrid &) Electric Vehicles in India (FAME India) Scheme in the year 2015 to promote manufacturing of electric and hybrid vehicle technology and to ensure sustainable growth of the same.
  • The Phase-I of this Scheme was initially launched for a period of 2 years, commencing from 1st April 2015, which was subsequently extended from time to time and the last extension was allowed up to 31st March 2019.

Focus areas –

The 1st Phase of FAME India Scheme was implemented through four focus areas namely –

  1. Demand Creation,
  2. Technology Platform,
  3. Pilot Project and
  4. Charging Infrastructure.

Market creation through demand incentives was aimed at incentivising all vehicle segments i.e. 2-Wheelers, 3-Wheelers Auto, Passenger 4-Wheeler vehicles, Light Commercial Vehicles and Buses.

About Fame India-II –

  • Emphasis is on electrification of the public transportation that includes shared transport.
  • To encourage advance technologies, the benefits of incentives, will be extended to only those vehicles which are fitted with advance battery like a Lithium Ion battery and other new technology batteries.
  • The scheme proposes for establishment of charging infrastructure, whereby about 2700 charging stations will be established in metros, other million plus cities, smart cities and cities of Hilly states across the country so that there will be availability of at least one charging station in a grid of 3 km x 3 km.

Daily MCQs

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